Winter Tires? Or All-Season Tires?

November 12th, 2015
Winter tires versus all-season tires…which is the right choice for you?
 
The two designs are quite different and deliver different levels of performance and winter-weather traction, so let’s discuss. 
All-season tires are designed as an all-around compromise. They feature a tread pattern that evacuates water from the tire’s contact patch to prevent hydroplaning, with plenty of small, textured slits (sipes) to add extra biting edges for traction in wet or slushy conditions. 
All-season tires are designed with a harder tread compound th ...[more]
  Posted in: Tires 101

Determining the Age of a Tire

February 14th, 2014
When it comes to determining the age of a tire, it is easiest to identify when the tire was manufactured by reading its Tire Identification Number (often referred to as the tire’s serial number or DOT number). Unlike vehicle identification numbers (VINs) and the serial numbers used on many other consumer goods (which identify one specific item), Tire Identification Numbers are really batch codes that identify several components.
 
The U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) requires that Tire Identification Numbers be a combination of the letters DOT, followed by ten, eleven or twelve letters or numbers that identify the manufacturing location, tire size and manufacturer's code, along with the week and year the tire was m ...[more]
  Posted in: Tire 101

Breaking in New Winter Tires

January 28th, 2014
 
Breaking in Winter Tires
 
Congratulations! You’ve taken the first step in winter safety and decided to invest in a set of winter tires. There are a few things you are going to want to remember about your winter tires, especially if this is your first time making the transition. A few things you may want to know: 
 
  • Depending on the kind of tires you select, you may notice a change in the feel/sound of your commute. Because winter tires have more of a grip on the road, they might sound louder depending on your vehicle. If you notice it at all, don’t panic. You are only hearing the added contact. If you add studs or chains to the mix, the sound will increase as well, and you may feel as if you are driving an armored tank down the road. Keep i ...[more]
  Posted in: Tire 101